Nurullaby Palace

Nurullaby Palace

Nurullaby Palace is located on the territory of Dishan-Kala, the outer defensive city of old Khiva. Its splendor was known throughout Russia, in addition, Russian masters, artists and architects, German experts took part in the construction of the palace. This is one of the reasons why the palace is very different from other similar buildings in the entire history of the east. The development of the internal fortress was complicated due to the limited space on the territory, and Dishan-Kala began to build up palaces and other significant buildings.

You can visit the attraction by ordering a historical tour to Uzbekistan.

Seyyid Mohammed Khan ordered to build a palace for receptions of dignitaries in the territory of the Nurullaby Garden. The garden was beautiful, famous, and occupied a significant territory. It was decided to act fairly, to redeem the garden from the owner. Muhammad Rahimkhan II, who ruled after his father at that time, agreed with the merchant Nurullabai to sell the garden. Nurullaby put only one condition for the name of the garden to be preserved, because it was famous among the people. Khan agreed and kept his word.

There was a fenced-off area in the palace where they placed the harem of the son of the ruler. Surrounded by a high wall, the curious did not approach him. The palace had bodyguards, a stable, and more than a hundred rooms, including rooms for servants. There was a reception room, an office, and there were fireplaces that were brought here from Russia. Huge mirrors in the main hall almost reached the ceiling.

After the death of Feruz, his son, Isfandiyarhan II, made some changes to the construction of the palace and completed it to his liking. The main task of the palace was to organize important ceremonies and meetings in it. At the same time, the construction of a hospital and a telegraph building was underway in Khiva, from which the treasury was already almost exhausted. But the khan was categorical, and by 1913 the khan's reception was completed. The building is solid, made of baked brick. The roof is covered with sheet metal. Most of the wooden structures, like doors, window frames and parquet floors, are the merit of the German craftsmen, who at that time lived 15 kilometers from the city.

The design of the ceiling and walls is a joint work of Uzbek and Russian masters. Gypsum patterns were skillfully made by local specialists, but the decoration was done by the master Vayisyaz Matkarimov and Russian artists. So, flowers with angels first appeared in bright oriental decor and patterns. The fourth hall, the reception itself, is decorated with gilding and geometric patterns. The cornices framing the ceilings were delivered straight from Russia.

Since the establishment of Soviet power in Khiva, the city has been electrified. During this period, the palace served as the home of the government. Later, a museum was organized here and educational work was carried out. Today the museum has undergone restoration and its original appearance has been reopened to tourists. The rich decoration, the mixture of Russian and Uzbek cultures, the impressive scale of the work of masters, inlaid with precious stones and all that for which funds were spent from the Khan's treasury are available for everyone to familiarize themselves with.

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